EGG-SIZE MANIPULATIONS IN THE SEED BEETLE STATOR LIMBATUS - CONSEQUENCES FOR PROGENY GROWTH

Authors
Citation
Cw. Fox, EGG-SIZE MANIPULATIONS IN THE SEED BEETLE STATOR LIMBATUS - CONSEQUENCES FOR PROGENY GROWTH, Canadian journal of zoology, 75(9), 1997, pp. 1465-1473
Citations number
51
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Zoology
Journal title
ISSN journal
0008-4301
Volume
75
Issue
9
Year of publication
1997
Pages
1465 - 1473
Database
ISI
SICI code
0008-4301(1997)75:9<1465:EMITSB>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
Studies that have demonstrated consequences of variation in egg size f or progeny growth and development are often confounded by genetic corr elations among life-history characters; relationships between egg size and progeny life-history characters do not always reflect cause and e ffect. Thus, experimental approaches to manipulating egg size in order to quantify the consequences of egg-size variation for progeny growth and development have been developed. I used egg-size plasticity in re sponse to oviposition environment to manipulate egg size in a seed bee tle, Stator limbatus, to test the hypothesis that progeny developing f rom larger eggs survive better, develop faster, and attain a larger ad ult body size than progeny developing from smaller eggs. Females expos ed to Cercidium floridum during egg maturation laid eggs that were sub stantially larger than those laid by females exposed to Acacia greggii during egg maturation. The larger eggs laid by females exposed to C. floridum took significantly longer to hatch but had shorter total egg- to-adult development times than eggs laid by females exposed to A. gre ggii (when reared to adulthood on A. greggii). There was no evidence f rom the between-treatment comparisons that egg size affected egg-to-ad ult survivorship or the size at which progeny emerged as adults. Withi n-treatment correlations between egg size and progeny life-history cha racters were generally consistent with the between-treatment analyses, except that female progeny developing from larger eggs tended to emer ge as larger adults than female progeny developing from smaller eggs. This result is interpreted as a consequence of heritable variation in body size rather than a cause-and-effect relationship between egg size and progeny body size.