THE DYNAMICS OF CHILDHOOD POVERTY

Citation
Me. Corcoran et A. Chaudry, THE DYNAMICS OF CHILDHOOD POVERTY, The Future of children, 7(2), 1997, pp. 40-54
Citations number
39
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Heath Policy & Services","Family Studies
Journal title
ISSN journal
1054-8289
Volume
7
Issue
2
Year of publication
1997
Pages
40 - 54
Database
ISI
SICI code
1054-8289(1997)7:2<40:TDOCP>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
Child poverty rates have remained high since the middle of the 1970s. While several trends, including declines in the number of children per family and increases in parental years of schooling, worked to reduce child poverty rates, several others, including slow economic growth, widening economic inequality, and increases in the proportion of child ren living in mother-only families, had the opposite effect, pushing m ore children into poverty. Poverty is a common risk: One-third of all children will be poor for at least one year. For many, poverty lasts o nly a short while, but for a small percentage, poverty persists both t hroughout childhood and into the adult years. Poverty is not shared eq ually across different demographic groups. African-American children, Latino children, and children in mother-only families are disproportio nately poor. Long-term poverty is even more concentrated than single-y ear poverty. In 1992, almost 90% of long-term poor children were Afric an-American as compared to all poor children (single-year and long-ter m poor), of whom 60% were white. Both family structure and the labor m arket are implicated in long-term childhood poverty. Changes in employ ment of family members and changes in family composition are each stro ngly associated with transitions into and out of childhood poverty. Of these, changes in employment are the most important.