Burkholderia ambifaria sp nov., a novel member of the Burkholderia cepaciacomplex including biocontrol and cystic fibrosis-related isolates

Citation
T. Coenye et al., Burkholderia ambifaria sp nov., a novel member of the Burkholderia cepaciacomplex including biocontrol and cystic fibrosis-related isolates, INT J SY EV, 51, 2001, pp. 1481-1490
Citations number
43
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Microbiology
Journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY
ISSN journal
1466-5026 → ACNP
Volume
51
Year of publication
2001
Part
4
Pages
1481 - 1490
Database
ISI
SICI code
1466-5026(200107)51:<1481:BASNAN>2.0.ZU;2-4
Abstract
A polyphasic taxonomic study, including amplified fragment length polymorph ism (AFLP) fingerprinting, DNA-DNA hybridizations, DNA base-ratio determina tions, phylogenetic analysis, whole-cell fatty acid analyses and an extensi ve biochemical characterization, was performed on 19 Burkholderia cepacia-l ike isolates from the environment and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Severa l of the environmental isolates have attracted considerable interest due to their biocontrol properties. The polyphasic taxonomic data showed that the strains represent a new member of the B. cepacia complex, for which the na me Burkholderia ambifaria sp. nov, is proposed. The type strain is strain L MG 19182(T). B, ambifaria can be differentiated from the other members of t he B. cepacia complex by means of AFLP fingerprinting, whole-cell fatty aci d analysis, biochemical tests (including ornithine and lysine decarboxylase activity, acidification of sucrose and P-haemolysis) and a newly developed recA gene-based PCR assay, 16S rDNA-based RFLP analysis and PCR tests allo wed differentiation of B. ambifaria from Burkholderia multivorans, Burkhold eria vietnamiensis and B, cepacia genomovar VI, but not from B. cepacia gen omovars I and III and Burkholderia stabilis. The finding that this new taxo n includes both strains isolated from CF patients and potentially useful bi ocontrol strains supports the general consensus that the large-scale use of biocontrol strains belonging to the B. cepacia complex would be ill-advise d until more is known about their potential pathogenic mechanisms.