Recovery from transport and acclimatisation of competition horses in a hothumid environment

Citation
Dj. Marlin et al., Recovery from transport and acclimatisation of competition horses in a hothumid environment, EQUINE V J, 33(4), 2001, pp. 371-379
Citations number
36
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Veterinary Medicine/Animal Health
Journal title
EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0425-1644 → ACNP
Volume
33
Issue
4
Year of publication
2001
Pages
371 - 379
Database
ISI
SICI code
0425-1644(200107)33:4<371:RFTAAO>2.0.ZU;2-R
Abstract
The aims of the present field-based study were to investigate changes in fi t horses undergoing acclimatisation to a hot humid environment and to provi de data on which to base recommendations for safe transport and acclimatisa tion. Six horses (age 7-12 years) were flown from Europe to Atlanta and und erwent a 16 day period of acclimatisation. Exercise conditions during accli matisation (wet bulb globe temperature index 27.6 +/- 0.0 [mean +/- s.e.]) were more thermally stressful compared with the European climate from which the horses had come (22.0 +/- 1.8, P <0.001), Following the flight, weight loss was 4.1 +/- 0.8% bodyweight and took around 7 days to recover. Water intake during the day was significantly increased (P <0.05) compared with n ight during acclimatisation, Daily mean exercise duration was 72 +/- 12 min and the majority of work was performed with a heart rate below 120 beats/m in. Respiratory rate (f(R)) was increased (P <0.05) throughout acclimatisat ion compared with in Europe, but resting morning (AM) and evening (PM) rect al temperature (T-REC), heart rate (f(C)) and plasma volume were unchanged. White blood cell (WBC) count was significantly increased at AM compared wi th in Europe on Days 4 and 10 of acclimatisation (P <0.01), but was not dif ferent by Day 16, In conclusion, horses exposed to hot humid environmental conditions without prior acclimatisation are able to accommodate these stre sses and, with appropriate management, remain fit and clinically healthy, w ithout significant risk of heat illness or heat-related disorders, provided they are allowed sufficient time to recover from transport, acclimatisatio n is undertaken gradually and they are monitored appropriately.