Osteoclast-like cells in an in vitro model of bone destruction by rheumatoid synovium

Citation
Y. Suzuki et al., Osteoclast-like cells in an in vitro model of bone destruction by rheumatoid synovium, RHEUMATOLOG, 40(6), 2001, pp. 673-682
Citations number
36
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Rheumatology
Journal title
RHEUMATOLOGY
ISSN journal
1462-0324 → ACNP
Volume
40
Issue
6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
673 - 682
Database
ISI
SICI code
1462-0324(200106)40:6<673:OCIAIV>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
Objective. Osteoclasts may be involved in the process of rheumatoid bone de struction. To lest this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro model of bone destruction by osteoclast-like cells derived from cultured rheumatoid synov ial tissue without using any inducers. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from rheumatoid arthritis and osteo arthritis patients and tissue pieces of about 2 mm(3) that contained synovi al lining were cultured. Multinucleated cells derived from cultured synovia l tissues were studied cytochemically and morphologically for osteoclast-sp ecific markers. Results. Fibroblast-like and macrophage-like cells from the tissue pieces p roliferated in the coexistence of lymphocytes. After 14 days of culture, mu ltinucleated cells with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity appear ed. These cells expressed vacuolar Hi-ATPase, the vitronectin receptor and cathepsin K. Although binding of I-125-labelled salmon calcitonin was very low, the cells contained ringed structures of F-actin and showed strong bon e-resorbing activity on ivory slices. Proliferation of macrophage-like cell s and formation of multinucleated cells continued during 6 months of cultur e in the presence of fibroblast-like cells. The bone-resorbing activity of multinucleated cells derived from rheumatoid synovial tissue was much highe r than that of cells from osteoarthritis synovial tissue, and was related t o the disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion. Our culture system reproduced in vitro the process of bone dest ruction by rheumatoid synovium, including the proliferation and fusion of p recursor cells, polarization, activation and bone tissue resorption. This s ystem may provide a tool for understanding the mechanisms of bone destructi on in rheumatoid arthritis and for the development of new therapies to prev ent bone destruction.