But it's not fair! Commonsense notions of unfairness

Authors
Citation
Nj. Finkel, But it's not fair! Commonsense notions of unfairness, PSYCH PUB L, 6(4), 2000, pp. 898-952
Citations number
97
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology
Journal title
PSYCHOLOGY PUBLIC POLICY AND LAW
ISSN journal
1076-8971 → ACNP
Volume
6
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
898 - 952
Database
ISI
SICI code
1076-8971(200012)6:4<898:BINFCN>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
Commonsense justice (N. J. Finkel, 1995b) is said to reflect what "ordinary people think is just and fair" (p. 2), yet little is known about "fair," a nd whether it reflects anything different than "just." As cries of "but it' s not fair!" are shrill and frequent, 4 studies and 2 experiments were unde rtaken to elucidate the essence of unfairness. In the 4 studies, college st udents, tots and teens (ages 4-17), adults (ages 25-60), and elderly partic ipants (ages 60-95) detailed their unfairnesses, which yielded more than 5, 000 instances, and from these an inclusive and reliable scheme for type of unfairness and for who or what is to blame resulted. Unfairness claims are not petty whines, in the main, but legitimate complaints, and outsider rate rs see them that way as well; nor are they simply narcissistic, for unfairn ess claims that happen to others engender the greatest heat. With basic not ions of "unfairness" underlying so many of our judgments regarding legal, p olitical, and interpersonal proceedings, this basic research attempts to fi ll a large gap in our understanding of commonsense fairness and unfairness.