Relationship between vegetation and soil seed banks in an arctic coastal marsh

Citation
Er. Chang et al., Relationship between vegetation and soil seed banks in an arctic coastal marsh, J ECOLOGY, 89(3), 2001, pp. 367-384
Citations number
65
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0022-0477 → ACNP
Volume
89
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
367 - 384
Database
ISI
SICI code
0022-0477(200106)89:3<367:RBVASS>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
1 The effects of habitat degradation on the soil seed bank at La Perouse Ba y, Manitoba are described. Foraging by lesser snow geese leads to loss of v egetation, coupled with changes in soil abiotic conditions and an increase in salinity. 2 The density of seeds and the relative abundance in the seed bank of speci es characteristic of undisturbed sites decrease following degradation, whil e the relative abundance of invasive species increases. Vegetation loss had the greatest impact on seed banks of stress-tolerant species and the least impact on species with many widely dispersed seeds. 3 The above-ground vegetation and below-ground seed bank were less similar in undamaged plots than in disturbed plots. In spite of the low degree of s imilarity, redundancy analysis of the data indicated that approximately hal f of the variation in the soil seed bank could be explained by the vegetati on data and vice versa. 4 More recently degraded soils had richer soil seed banks than those from o lder disturbances. Site-specific factors not only influenced the species pr esent but also the time lag between loss of vegetation and loss of the seed bank. Seed banks in these impacted and fragmented sites do not recover qui ckly. 5 Seed banks in sandy beach-ridges were less affected by degradation due to the greater proportion of ruderals present in the original vegetation and the absence of the high soil salinities that are characteristic of degraded salt-marsh soils.