Host finding and oviposition behavior in a chrysomelid specialist - The importance of host plant surface waxes

Citation
C. Muller et M. Hilker, Host finding and oviposition behavior in a chrysomelid specialist - The importance of host plant surface waxes, J CHEM ECOL, 27(5), 2001, pp. 985-994
Citations number
39
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0098-0331 → ACNP
Volume
27
Issue
5
Year of publication
2001
Pages
985 - 994
Database
ISI
SICI code
0098-0331(200105)27:5<985:HFAOBI>2.0.ZU;2-U
Abstract
Although several studies have elucidated the role of plant epicuticular wax es in host recognition and oviposition by herbivorous insects, there is lit tle known about this subject in Chrysomelidae. In the present study, chemic al cues for host recognition behavior and oviposition by the monophagous ch rysomelid species Cassida stigmatica were investigated with special regard to surface waxes of the host plant, Tanacetrum vulgare (Asteraceae). After hibernation in the soil, adults of this species must climb the plant's peti oles, which emerge from the ground in spring. The response of adult C. stig matica to contact and volatile cues from petioles and leaves of T. vulgare was investigated in a "stem arena," in which differently treated petioles a nd petiole dummies were offered. Volatile and contact cues of T. vulgare pe tioles served as well for host recognition. The contact cues were isolated from the petioles and leaves by hexane extraction and by cellulose acetate treatment, which removed cuticular waxes. The attractive volatiles were not extracted sufficiently by hexane. To examine the role of cuticular waxes o f the host leaf surface in oviposition, female C. stigmatica were offered i ntact leaflets and leaflets from which cuticular waxes had been stripped by cellulose acetate treatment. Females did not discriminate between intact a nd stripped leaflets when only the upper leaf surfaces were offered. Howeve r, when the lower leaf surfaces that are generally used as oviposition site s were offered, C. stigmatica preferred to lay eggs on intact leaflets. We conclude that waxes of the lower leaf surface contain crucial information f or oviposition in C. stigmatica.