Do hair care practices affect the acquisition of tinea capitis? A case-control study

Citation
V. Sharma et al., Do hair care practices affect the acquisition of tinea capitis? A case-control study, ARCH PED AD, 155(7), 2001, pp. 818-821
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Pediatrics,"Medical Research General Topics
Journal title
ARCHIVES OF PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENT MEDICINE
ISSN journal
1072-4710 → ACNP
Volume
155
Issue
7
Year of publication
2001
Pages
818 - 821
Database
ISI
SICI code
1072-4710(200107)155:7<818:DHCPAT>2.0.ZU;2-2
Abstract
Objective: To determine the influences of hair-grooming practices and envir onmental factors as risk factors for the acquisition of tinea capitis (TC) in children. Design: Case-control study comparing children with culture-proved TC with a ge-, sex-, and race-matched control subjects without scalp disease. Setting: A multicenter study involving 3 urban referral centers in the Unit ed States. Participants: A convenience sample of 66 patients aged 12 years and younger presenting to pediatric dermatology clinics with clinical evidence of TC w ere enrolled as cases. Matched control subjects (n=68), without known scalp disease, were enrolled from the outpatient pediatric clinics at the same i nstitutions. Results: Significant associations with TC in the conditional logistic regre ssion model were a prior history of TC (odds ratio, 3.11; 95% confidence in terval, 1.02-9.43; P=.04) and exposure to TC (odds ratio, 16.32; 95% confid ence interval, 3.55-75.16; P=.001). The use of a hair conditioner was stati stically significant in the univariable model but not in the multivariable model (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.08; P=.07). Hairst yling, frequency of washing, use of oils or grease, and other hair care pra ctices were not shown to be associated with the presence of TC. Conclusion: Hair-grooming practices do not appear to plap a major role in t he acquisition of TC. Hair conditioners may be protective in children at ri sk for TC, but further studies are needed to confirm this finding.