Butyl acetate and yeasts interact in adhesion and germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia in vitro and in fungal decay of golden delicious apple

Authors
Citation
Ab. Filonow, Butyl acetate and yeasts interact in adhesion and germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia in vitro and in fungal decay of golden delicious apple, J CHEM ECOL, 27(4), 2001, pp. 831-844
Citations number
21
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0098-0331 → ACNP
Volume
27
Issue
4
Year of publication
2001
Pages
831 - 844
Database
ISI
SICI code
0098-0331(200104)27:4<831:BAAYII>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
Butyl acetate is a volatile aroma and flavor compound in apple. Conidia of three strains of Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that causes decay of apple frui t in postharvest storage, had greater adhesion to and greater germination o n polycarbonate membrane fillers on water inside sealed 500 cc glass jars t hat were injected with 4 mul butyl acetate than conidia not so exposed. Con idial germination was highly correlated with conidial adhesion. The yeasts Sporobolomyces roseus and Cryptococcus laurentii, but not Saccharomyces,cer evisiae, reduced the adhesion and germination promoting effect of butyl ace tate. Conidia did not readily utilize butyl acetate as a food source, as sh own by lack: of tetrazolium violet reduction, whereas S. roseus and C. laur entii, but not S. cerevisiae did. Butyl acetate added to suspensions of con idia increased the electrical conductivity of the suspensions and increased the loss of C-14 from C-14-labeled conidia compared to conidia unexposed t o butyl acetate. Uptake of [C-14]glucose by conidia was not increased by bu tyl acetate. Wounds of Golden Delicious apples inoculated with conidia (str ain F-J-4) in a dilute solution of butyl acetate had greater decay than une xposed wounds. S. roseus and C. laurentii, but not S. cerevisiae, added wit h the conidia decreased the incidence or size of decay. Results indicated t hat butyl acetate increased conidial adhesion, stimulating conidial germina tion, and some yeasts can reduce this effect.