Using hybrid systems to explore the evolution of tolerance to damage

Citation
Cg. Hochwender et al., Using hybrid systems to explore the evolution of tolerance to damage, EVOL ECOL, 14(4-6), 2000, pp. 509-521
Citations number
65
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0269-7653 → ACNP
Volume
14
Issue
4-6
Year of publication
2000
Pages
509 - 521
Database
ISI
SICI code
0269-7653(2000)14:4-6<509:UHSTET>2.0.ZU;2-O
Abstract
Hybridization is common and important to the adaptive evolution of plants. Hybridization has resulted in the formation of new species and the introgre ssion of traits between species. This paper discusses the advantages of usi ng hybrid systems to explore the evolution of tolerance to herbivore damage (i.e., the ability to diminish the negative effects of damage on fitness). The major consequence of hybridization likely to make it influential for t olerance evolution is that hybridization generates broad variation in trait s that can be selected for or against. In addition to generating greater va riation in tolerance to damage and its putative traits (e.g., traits associ ated with allocation patterns and meristem production), hybridization can g enerate greater independence among tolerance traits and between tolerance a nd defense traits. Greater independence may provide a greater ability to di scern mechanisms of tolerance, give a greater probability of detecting allo cation costs of tolerance, and provide an effective means to evaluate trade offs between tolerance and defense. Interspecific hybrid systems can also b e used to evaluate the importance of co-adaptation of tolerance traits. Mor eover, recombinant hybrids can be used in selection studies focusing on tol erance to damage to discern whether parental combinations of tolerance trai ts are favored over novel combinations. Research in hybrid systems that inv estigate the selective importance of tolerance, the patterns of inheritance of tolerance traits, and the genetic architecture of plant species involve d can be vital to our evaluation of the adaptive role of tolerance to damag e.