Knee and ankle: human joints with different susceptibility to osteoarthritis reveal different cartilage cellularity and matrix synthesis in vitro

Authors
Citation
K. Huch, Knee and ankle: human joints with different susceptibility to osteoarthritis reveal different cartilage cellularity and matrix synthesis in vitro, ARCH ORTHOP, 121(6), 2001, pp. 301-306
Citations number
20
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Ortopedics, Rehabilitation & Sport Medicine
Journal title
ARCHIVES OF ORTHOPAEDIC AND TRAUMA SURGERY
ISSN journal
0936-8051 → ACNP
Volume
121
Issue
6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
301 - 306
Database
ISI
SICI code
0936-8051(200106)121:6<301:KAAHJW>2.0.ZU;2-T
Abstract
Clinical experience shows that symptoms and pathological changes of primary osteoarthritis (OA) are more frequent and severer in the knee than in the ankle joint. The different anatomy of both weight-bearing joints implies th at biomechanical differences may contribute to their varying susceptibility to OA. This study aims at elucidating other non-biomechanical factors to e xplain these fundamental differences in secondary OA prevalence. Human cart ilage of matched ankle and knee joints from organ donors was dissected in f ull-thickness slices or in layers. The DNA content for estimation of cell n umber was analyzed fluorometrically. Chondrocytes were cultured in organ cu lture or after isolation in alginate. Proteoglycan synthesis was determined by S-35 incorporation, and collagen synthesis by H-3-proline incorporation . This study demonstrates that in both joints, the cell density sharply dec lines between newborn and young infant ages. In addition, cartilage from th e ankle joint is significantly more cellular than cartilage from the knee j oint. In general, ankle chondrocytes synthesize more proteoglycans (PGs) an d collagens than knee chondrocytes, and deep zone chondrocytes more than su perficial zone chondrocytes. The biochemical properties of chondrocytes of the ankle and knee joints differ significantly and might play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA.