Selected aspects of technical standardization from the DIN perspective

Authors
Citation
G. Weber, Selected aspects of technical standardization from the DIN perspective, STAHL EISEN, 121(6), 2001, pp. 23-26
Citations number
11
Language
TEDESCO
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Metallurgy
Journal title
STAHL UND EISEN
ISSN journal
0340-4803 → ACNP
Volume
121
Issue
6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
23 - 26
Database
ISI
SICI code
0340-4803(20010618)121:6<23:SAOTSF>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
Standardization in Germany started at the end of the 19th century in the fo rm of company standards in large companies and as cross-company agreements at association level, i.e. standardization was initiated by the industry. I n 1917 the Standards Committee of the German Industry was founded as a nati onal, cross-company, autonomous, non-public body. This institution was the predecessor of the DIN. The far-sightedness of this move was really remarka ble in view of the fact that despite the pressure due to arms production in the middle of the first world war the Committee worked based on voluntary agreements and according to democratic principles. This was a decisive reas on for the success of industry-wide standardization and a key prerequisite for the democratic legitimacy for standards to concretize the technical con tents and implications of regulations and laws. The New Approach introduced by the Council of Ministers of the European Community in 1985 was another propelling effect for the growing importance of industry-wide standardizati on. Since then the European states have seen dramatic restructuring of thei r standardization systems, replacing the purely national standards by harmo nised European or International standards. The DIN has been playing the cen tral role in the organization of this process. This function requires major financial resources: Approx. 20 % of the overall budget of the DIN in the amount of approx. 170 million DM land direct sponsorship of the DKE and ext ernal standardization committees) must be provided by the industry in the f orm of contributions to ongoing standardization projects and in the form of membership fees. The advantages for the industry far outweigh the cost. Th is was proved in a study carried out by a neutral body. A central message o f this study to the attention of the industry is: Active standardization (c o)work generates competitive advantages; staying out involves great risks.