Structural, electrical, and optical properties of SnO2 nanocrystalline thin films grown on p-InSb (111) substrates

Citation
Tw. Kim et al., Structural, electrical, and optical properties of SnO2 nanocrystalline thin films grown on p-InSb (111) substrates, J APPL PHYS, 90(1), 2001, pp. 175-180
Citations number
24
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Apllied Physucs/Condensed Matter/Materiales Science
Journal title
JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS
ISSN journal
0021-8979 → ACNP
Volume
90
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
175 - 180
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-8979(20010701)90:1<175:SEAOPO>2.0.ZU;2-Y
Abstract
SnO2 thin films were grown on p-InSb (111) substrates by radio-frequency ma gnetron sputtering at low temperature. Atomic force microscopy images showe d that the root mean square of the average surface roughness of the SnO2 fi lms grown on the InSb (111) substrates with an Ar/O-2 flow rate of 0.667 an d at a temperature of 200 degreesC had a minimum value of 2.71 nm, and x-ra y diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements showe d that these SnO2 thin films were polycrystalline. Auger electron spectrosc opy and bright-field TEM measurements showed that the SnO2/p-InSb(111) hete rointerface was relatively abrupt. High-resolution TEM measurements reveale d that the SnO2 films were nanocrystalline and that the grain sizes of the nanocystalline films were below 6.8 nm. The capacitance-voltage measurement s at room temperature showed that the type and the carrier concentration of the nominally undoped SnO2 film were n type and approximately 1.67x10(16) cm(-3), respectively, and the current-voltage curve indicated that the Au/n -SnO2/p-InSb diode showed tunneling breakdown. Photoluminescence spectra sh owed that peaks corresponding to the donor acceptor pair transitions were d ominant and that the peak positions did not change significantly as a funct ion of the measured temperature. These results indicate that the SnO2 nanoc rystalline thin films grown on p-InSb (111) substrates at low temperature h old promise for new kinds of potential optoelectronic devices based on InSb substrates, such as superior gas sensors and high-efficiency solar cells. (C) 2001 American Institute of Physics.