A double disadvantage? Minority group, immigrant status, and underemployment in the United States

Citation
Gf. De Jong et Ab. Madamba, A double disadvantage? Minority group, immigrant status, and underemployment in the United States, SOC SCI Q, 82(1), 2001, pp. 117-130
Citations number
38
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY
ISSN journal
0038-4941 → ACNP
Volume
82
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
117 - 130
Database
ISI
SICI code
0038-4941(200103)82:1<117:ADDMGI>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
Objective. This study documents the magnitude of four types of underemploym ent experienced by both native-born minority and ethnic immigrant male and Female workers in the United States and tests a "double disadvantage" econo mic outcome hypothesis that minority workers tend to be channeled into seco ndary sector jobs and that immigrant workers face initial disadvantages in labor force assimilation. Method. Data for men and women aged 25-64 who are in the labor force and not attending school were derived from the 1990 Cen sus Bureau Public Use Microdata Sample. Multinomial logistic regression pro cedures were used to estimate the effect of minority group membership and i mmigrant status on the odds of unemployment, part-time employment, working poverty, and job mismatch, relative so adequate employment. Results. Descri ptive results showed greater overall underemployment among females than mal es. Blacks and Hispanics had higher unemployment and working-poverty rates compared to non-Hispanic whites and Asians, with job mismatch highest among Asians. Immigrant underemployment was greater than that of the native-born . Asians posted the largess disparity in immigrant versus native-born under employment, and blacks had the smallest. Multivariate models showed that mi nority group effects were stronger than immigrant status effects in predict ing underemployment, Increased likelihood of underemployment across the dif ferent minority groups versus non-Hispanic white workers was nor fully acco unted for by the expected influences of human-capital, demographic, industr y, and occupational variables. Conclusion. The double disadvantage hypothes is of minority group and immigrant status is accepted only for Asian men an d women with jobs mismatched to their skills and for Asian women, who are m ost likely to be unemployed or be among the working poor.