WAIS-III reliability data for clinical groups

Citation
Jj. Zhu et al., WAIS-III reliability data for clinical groups, J INT NEURO, 7(7), 2001, pp. 862-866
Citations number
13
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Neurology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY
ISSN journal
1355-6177 → ACNP
Volume
7
Issue
7
Year of publication
2001
Pages
862 - 866
Database
ISI
SICI code
1355-6177(200111)7:7<862:WRDFCG>2.0.ZU;2-G
Abstract
Reliability estimates for psychological tests are almost always reported fo r nonclinical populations (e.g.. tile normative samples). Such practice wil l no longer be sufficient as the ne standards for testing call for an adequ ate assessment of psychometric properties within the specific population be ing tested. The purpose of this study was to prod ide internal consistency reliability estimates for clinical groups on the Wechsler Adult Intelligenc e Scale-Third Edition. The study included data from 403 clinical participan ts composed of 10 groups of adult,, recruited as part of the WAIS-III clini cal validity studies. Split-half reliability coefficient,,, were obtained f or these groups replicating the procedure used in the WAIS-III. With 8 of t he clinical groups. the split-half reliability coefficients were comparable to. or even higher than. those reported for the WAIS-III standardization s ample. In general, the split-half coefficient,, for the Verbal subtests ten ded to be higher than the coefficient,, for the Performance subtests. The h igh magnitude and general pattern of these coefficients demonstrate that th e WAIS-III scales do not include additional error variance above and beyond hat is reported in the WAIS-III-WMS-III Technical Manual kk hen it was use d to assess certain clinical groups. For the ADHD/ADD and learning disabili ties groups, however, tile internal consistencies coefficients of some subt ests were relatively lower, although not statistically significant, than th e normative sample. These findings may reflect more heterogeneity within th e groups. The implications for assessment and for using alternate methods o f determining the psychometric properties in these Populations are discusse d.