Cortisol in urine and saliva: relations to the intima media thickness, IMT

Citation
Nh. Eller et al., Cortisol in urine and saliva: relations to the intima media thickness, IMT, ATHEROSCLER, 159(1), 2001, pp. 175-185
Citations number
38
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems","Cardiovascular & Hematology Research
Journal title
ATHEROSCLEROSIS
ISSN journal
0021-9150 → ACNP
Volume
159
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
175 - 185
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-9150(200111)159:1<175:CIUASR>2.0.ZU;2-3
Abstract
Objective: The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (I MT) of the artery carotis communis. Design and methods: In a cross-sectiona l study, 121 healthy participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire. Additionally, three samples of urine and four samples of saliva were collec ted in the 24 h before the examination, which included an ultrasound examin ation of the artery carotis communis, measuring height, weight, hip and wai st width, blood pressure after 10 min of rest, and analysis of blood sample s for cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and HbA(1c). The highest average of three measurements of IMT immediately before cartos is bulbous from either left or right side was used in the analyses as the d ependent variable IMT. Results: Values of cortisol in urine adjusted for cr eatinine were not related to IMT, but the level of salivary cortisol I h af ter awakening and the reactivity in salivary cortisol the first hour after awakening were significantly associated with IMT in women i.e. high cortiso l was associated with low IMT. This result remained significant in multiple regression analysis including age, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, HbA (1c), and alcohol. Conclusion: The reactivity in salivary cortisol the firs t hour in the morning might be used in research relating to stress, hormona l changes and early atherosclerosis. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.