Asymmetrical generalisation between pheromonal and floral odours in appetitive olfactory conditioning of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

Citation
Jc. Sandoz et al., Asymmetrical generalisation between pheromonal and floral odours in appetitive olfactory conditioning of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.), J COMP PH A, 187(7), 2001, pp. 559-568
Citations number
53
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Physiology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A-SENSORY NEURAL AND BEHAVIORAL PHYSIOLOGY
ISSN journal
0340-7594 → ACNP
Volume
187
Issue
7
Year of publication
2001
Pages
559 - 568
Database
ISI
SICI code
0340-7594(200109)187:7<559:AGBPAF>2.0.ZU;2-M
Abstract
The capacity to generalise between similar but not identical olfactory stim uli is crucial for honey bees, allowing them to find rewarding food sources with varying volatile emissions. We studied bees' generalisation behaviour with odours having different biological values: typical floral odours or a larm compounds. Bees' behavioural and peripheral electrophysiological respo nses were investigated using a combined proboscis extension response condit ioning-electroantennogram assay. Bees were conditioned to pure linalool (fl oral) or to pure isoamyl acetate (alarm) and were tested with different con centrations of both compounds. Electrophysiological responses were not infl uenced by conditioning, suggesting that the learning of individual compound s does not rely on modulations of peripheral sensitivity. Behaviourally, ge neralisation responses of bees conditioned to the alarm compound were much higher than those of bees conditioned to the floral odour. We further demon strated such asymmetrical generalisation between alarm and floral odours by using differential conditioning procedures. Conditioning to alarm compound s (isoamyl acetate or 2-heptanone) consistently induced more generalisation than conditioning to floral compounds (linalool or phenylacetaldehyde). In terestingly, generalisation between the two alarm compounds, which are othe rwise chemically different, was extremely high. These results are discussed in relation to the neural representation of compounds with different biolo gical significance for bees.