Effects of aggression and wing removal on brain serotonin levels in male crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus

Citation
S. Murakami et Mt. Itoh, Effects of aggression and wing removal on brain serotonin levels in male crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus, J INSECT PH, 47(11), 2001, pp. 1309-1312
Citations number
14
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Entomology/Pest Control",Physiology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF INSECT PHYSIOLOGY
ISSN journal
0022-1910 → ACNP
Volume
47
Issue
11
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1309 - 1312
Database
ISI
SICI code
0022-1910(200111)47:11<1309:EOAAWR>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
When pairs of adult male crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) that had been house d individually for 7 days were placed together, they fought, and dominant-s ubordinate relationships were formed within I min. Aggressive behavior by t he dominant male was repeated during the period in which the two males were kept together. Immediately after 10 min of aggressive interaction, brain s erotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels were unchanged in dominant male s and significantly reduced in subordinate males. The emission of aggressiv e song by dominant males is known to be abolished by removal of the wings. Ali wings were thus removed from male crickets. After 7 days of isolation, pairs of wingless males were placed together. The wingless males fought and formed dominant-subordinate relationships within 1 min. The wingless, domi nant males displayed aggressive behavior. Brain 5-HT levels in the wingless males were reduced immediately after 10 min of aggressive interaction, and no significant differences in brain 5-HT levels were detected between the dominant and subordinate males, unlike the case for intact males. These dat a indicate a difference in brain serotonergic activity between dominant and subordinate male crickets during aggressive interaction, and suggest that aggressive behavior by dominant male crickets rapidly reduce brain 5-HT lev els in subordinate ones. Furthermore, the data suggest that aggressive song is responsible for the change in brain 5-HT levels. (C) 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.