Effects of shelterwood and soil scarification on deer browsing on planted Norway spruce Picea abies L. (Karst) seedlings

Citation
J. Bergquist et al., Effects of shelterwood and soil scarification on deer browsing on planted Norway spruce Picea abies L. (Karst) seedlings, FORESTRY, 74(4), 2001, pp. 359-367
Citations number
29
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Plant Sciences
Journal title
FORESTRY
ISSN journal
0015-752X → ACNP
Volume
74
Issue
4
Year of publication
2001
Pages
359 - 367
Database
ISI
SICI code
0015-752X(2001)74:4<359:EOSASS>2.0.ZU;2-0
Abstract
The level of browsing damage to Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) seedli ngs planted in shelterwoods was compared with the level of damage sustained on clearcuts in a large-scale experiment in southern Sweden. Prior to cutt ing, the forests contained a mixture of Norway spruce and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), while the shelterwoods were dominated by pine. Each shelte rwood and clearcut was divided into an area where the ground was scarified before planting and an area where the ground was left untreated. During the winter of 1996-1997, one to two years after planting, 11.7 per cent of the spruce seedlings were browsed. Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.) were like ly to have been responsible for most of the damage. There were no significa nt differences in the amount of damage between treatments. Bilberry (Vaccin ium myrtillus L.), which is often regarded as an important food source for roe deer during winter, was more common in shelterwoods than in clearcuts. Nevertheless, roe deer tended to be more abundant in clearcuts than in shel terwoods. Our results indicate that a choice between shelterwood and clearc ut regeneration will only have a limited influence on the level of roe deer browsing damage the first years after clearcutting.