Nuclear localization of beta-catenin in the hair matrix cells and differentiated keratinocytes

Citation
H. Tsuji et al., Nuclear localization of beta-catenin in the hair matrix cells and differentiated keratinocytes, J DERMA SCI, 27(3), 2001, pp. 170-177
Citations number
23
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Dermatology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGICAL SCIENCE
ISSN journal
0923-1811 → ACNP
Volume
27
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
170 - 177
Database
ISI
SICI code
0923-1811(200111)27:3<170:NLOBIT>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
beta -Catenin is a structural component of adherens junctions and also a do wnstream effector of Wnt signaling pathway. beta -Catenin has been detected in the adherens junctions in almost all normal tissues including the epide rmis. Only in some malignant tumor cells was it found in the cytoplasm and nuclei. Recently pilomatricoma was found to be caused by mutations of amino -terminal segment of beta -catenin, normally involved in phosphorylation-de pendent ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the protein. Since nuclear beta - catenin has not been detected in pilomatricoma or any other benign follicul ar tumors. we investigated localization of beta -catenin in the normal hair follicle, follicular tumor cells, normal and psoriatic epidermis by using immunohistochemical method with a high temperature antigen unmasking techni que. The nuclear localization of beta -catenin was detected not only in the matrix cells of follicular tumors including pilomatricoma but also in the normal hair matrix cells and the differentiated keratinocytes of the upper layers of the epidermis. Cell membrane staining of beta -catenin and E-cadh erin was decreased in these differentiated keratinocytes. This coincided wi th the emergence of nuclear beta -catenin. The present immunohistochemical method has revealed hitherto unproven nuclear localization of beta -catenin in hair matrix cells. Our results also provided evidence suggesting that b eta -catenin plays an important role in keratinocyte differentiation. (C) 2 001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.