Morphological characteristics associated with tolerance to competition from herbaceous vegetation for seedlings of jack pine, black spruce, and whitepine

Citation
Tl. Noland et al., Morphological characteristics associated with tolerance to competition from herbaceous vegetation for seedlings of jack pine, black spruce, and whitepine, NEW FOREST, 21(3), 2001, pp. 199-215
Citations number
32
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Plant Sciences
Journal title
NEW FORESTS
ISSN journal
0169-4286 → ACNP
Volume
21
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
199 - 215
Database
ISI
SICI code
0169-4286(2001)21:3<199:MCAWTT>2.0.ZU;2-N
Abstract
Tolerance of bareroot and container-grown seedlings of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), and eastern whi te pine (Pinus strobus L.) to competition from herbaceous vegetation was ex amined in the first five years after planting on a site in the Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence forest of Ontario, Canada. Shoot and root morphological charac teristics of various stocktypes were measured before planting and correlate d with 5-year survival and growth following control and no control of herba ceous vegetation. For black spruce and jack pine, medium-sized bareroot sto cktypes had greater relative 5-year stem volume growth in the presence of h erbaceous vegetation than did container stock of either species or large ba reroot stock of spruce. Relative volume growth was measured as the ratio of the cumulative stem volume increment in the presence of vegetation (Veg) t o that in the absence of vegetation (NoVeg), i.e., the Veg:NoVeg ratio. In white pine, the Veg:NoVeg ratio of volume increment of medium container and large bareroot stocktypes exceeded that of small container and medium bare root stocktypes. In jack pine, root collar diameter at planting and number of first-order lateral roots were positively correlated with 5-year Veg:NoV eg ratio of volume increment. In white pine, the Veg:NoVeg ratio was also p ositively correlated with root collar diameter at planting and with root vo lume. In black spruce, the ratio was not related to pre-plant morphology. T hus, for white pine and jack pine, certain pre-plant morphological features may be useful in forecasting the relative ability of different stocktypes to grow under herbaceous competition conditions in the field.