Dispersion, habitat use, hunting behavior, vocalizations, and conservationstatus of the New Guinea Harpy Eagle (Harpyopsis novaeguineae)

Citation
M. Watson et S. Asoyama, Dispersion, habitat use, hunting behavior, vocalizations, and conservationstatus of the New Guinea Harpy Eagle (Harpyopsis novaeguineae), J RAPT RES, 35(3), 2001, pp. 235-239
Citations number
18
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Animal Sciences
Journal title
JOURNAL OF RAPTOR RESEARCH
ISSN journal
0892-1016 → ACNP
Volume
35
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
235 - 239
Database
ISI
SICI code
0892-1016(200109)35:3<235:DHUHBV>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
We studied the dispersion, habitat use, hunting behavior, vocalizations, an d conservation status of the New Guinea Harpy Eagle (Harpyopsis navaeguinea e) from December 1998-October 1999 in Crater Mountain Wildlife Management A rea (CMWMA,), Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. Based on territ ory mapping, we estimated that the mean home range size was 13.0 +/-3.9 km( 2) (+/- SD, N=5). One pair we followed for 42 d over a 4 mo period used air area of only 0.25 km(2). We followed the male hunting in this area for 6 d (510 min). A small sample of prey items included ground-dwelling species s uch as forest wallaby (Dorcopsulus sp.), juvenile Dwarf Cassowary (Casuariu s bennetti), New Guinea Megapode (Megapodius decollatus), and an arboreal m arsupial. Eagles called mainly during daylight hours, mostly near sunup. Sp ectrogram analysis indicated there were two main calls. A continuous, low f requency, far-carrying call that was used to advertise territories and for contact between mates over distances <2 km and a higher frequency, chicken- like call that was used in interactions between individuals that were close to each other and during hunting, perhaps as a stimulus or lure for prey. In contrast to the rest of the Highlands, eagles were protected inside CMWM A under agreements between villagers and international conservation organiz ations.