Acting nasty in the face of failure? Longitudinal observations of "hard-to-manage" children playing a rigged competitive game with a friend

Citation
C. Hughes et al., Acting nasty in the face of failure? Longitudinal observations of "hard-to-manage" children playing a rigged competitive game with a friend, J ABN C PSY, 29(5), 2001, pp. 403-416
Citations number
54
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
ISSN journal
0091-0627 → ACNP
Volume
29
Issue
5
Year of publication
2001
Pages
403 - 416
Database
ISI
SICI code
0091-0627(200110)29:5<403:ANITFO>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Abstract
Peer problems are almost universal among children with disruptive behavior disorders, and have been linked to social information processing deficits t hat lead to heightened threat responses (K. A. Dodge, 1980). This 2-year lo ngitudinal study uses direct observations to examine the real-life signific ance of this finding. Forty "hard-to-manage" children and 40 typically deve loping control children were filmed at ages 5 and 7 playing a rigged compet itive game in which they experienced a clear threat of losing. Group differ ences in negative behavior (hard-to-manage > controls) were stable over tim e and independent of verbal ability. Predictors of individual differences i n negative behavior were also examined. Previous studies with this sample h ave shown that at 4 years of age, the hard-to-manage children displayed ele vated frequencies of violent pretend play (J. Dunn & C. Hughes, 2001), coup led with poor performance on tests of executive function and theory of mind (C. Hughes, J. Dunn, & A. White, 1998). In this study, 4-year-olds whose p retend play indicated a preoccupation with violence were more likely to res pond negatively to the threat of losing a competitive game at age 5 and at age 7. Four-year-olds who performed poorly on tests of theory of mind and e xecutive function showed higher rates of negative behavior at age 5 but not age 7. These findings highlight just a few of the multiple paths leading t o peer problems among children with disruptive behavior problems.