Ecocentrism and anthropocentrism: Moral reasoning about ecological commonsdilemmas

Citation
Kv. Kortenkamp et Cf. Moore, Ecocentrism and anthropocentrism: Moral reasoning about ecological commonsdilemmas, J ENVIR PSY, 21(3), 2001, pp. 261-272
Citations number
27
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
EnvirnmentalStudies Geografy & Development
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
ISSN journal
0272-4944 → ACNP
Volume
21
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
261 - 272
Database
ISI
SICI code
0272-4944(200109)21:3<261:EAAMRA>2.0.ZU;2-S
Abstract
When do humans extend their ethical scope to include nature? Anthropocentri sm and ecocentrism are two ways of understanding an extension of ethics to nature. In an anthropocentric ethic nature deserves moral consideration bec ause how nature is treated affects humans. In an ecocentric ethic nature de serves moral consideration because nature has intrinsic value. In two exper iments participants (n = 91 and 84) generated moral reasoning responses to ecological moral dilemmas. The reasoning was coded as ecocentric, anthropoc entric, or nonenvironmental (i.e., social contracts, truthfulness). Individ ual differences and situational variables were examined in relation to mora l reasoning about ecological dilemmas. Pro-environmental attitudes were rel ated to more ecocentric and anthropocentric and less nonenvironmental reaso ning. The presence of information about the impact of ecological damage on the environment, especially a more "wild" environment, elicited more ecocen tric reasoning, while the presence of a social commitment elicited more non enviromnental moral reasoning. The implications of the research for conflic ts over environmental commons dilemmas are discussed. (C) 2001 Academic Pre ss.