Physician support and patient psychologic responses after surgery for nonsmall cell lung carcinoma - A prospective observational study

Citation
Y. Uchitomi et al., Physician support and patient psychologic responses after surgery for nonsmall cell lung carcinoma - A prospective observational study, CANCER, 92(7), 2001, pp. 1926-1935
Citations number
33
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Oncology,"Onconogenesis & Cancer Research
Journal title
CANCER
ISSN journal
0008-543X → ACNP
Volume
92
Issue
7
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1926 - 1935
Database
ISI
SICI code
0008-543X(20011001)92:7<1926:PSAPPR>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
BACKGROUND. In patients with cancer, depression and coping have been sugges ted to be important psychologic responses that may be associated with quali ty of life. Social support, especially from physicians, is considered impor tant for cancer patients during their illness. The authors have investigate d the impact of physician support on psychologic responses, including depre ssion, psychologic distress and coping (such as fighting spirit and helples sness/hopelessness) in a cohort of patients with early-stage lung carcinoma . METHODS. After curative resection for nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, 226 pat ients were enrolled in a longitudinal study. The extent of social support, including physician support, was measured in structured interviews conducte d 1 and 3 months after surgery. During the interviews, psychologic response s were measured using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R, the Profiles of Mood States, and the Mental Adjustment to Cancer scale. Univari ate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the impact of physician support on psychologic responses. RESULTS. Physician support had no effect on depression, but correlated nega tively with psychologic distress (P < 0.05) and helplessness/hopelessness ( P < 0.05), and positively with fighting spirit (P < 0.01). Multivariate ana lyses controlling for confounding biomedical and psychosocial variables rev ealed only physician support had a significant impact on fighting spirit, i ndependently. However, this effect was limited to female patients or patien ts with no history of depression. CONCLUSION. In postoperative patients with nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, ph ysician support may have a significant impact on fighting spirit, but this effect appears to be limited to female patients or patients with no history of depression. (C) 2001 American Cancer Society.