Nocturnal home hemodialysis in North America

Citation
Rs. Lockridge et al., Nocturnal home hemodialysis in North America, ADV RENAL R, 8(4), 2001, pp. 250-256
Citations number
11
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Urology & Nephrology
Journal title
ADVANCES IN RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY
ISSN journal
1073-4449 → ACNP
Volume
8
Issue
4
Year of publication
2001
Pages
250 - 256
Database
ISI
SICI code
1073-4449(200110)8:4<250:NHHINA>2.0.ZU;2-F
Abstract
Nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHD) was made possible in the 1960s by fail-sa fe monitoring, the Scribner shunt, and low-resistant Kiil dialyzer allowing hemodialysis without a blood pump. In London, Sheldon was the first to use overnight home hemodialysis. The Lynchburg NHD program and Lisa Murphy, a dietician in Bender's NHD program in Kansas City, developed a questionnaire for short daily hemodialysis and NHD. The questionnaire was sent to all kn own daily hemodialysis programs in North America. Some advances in nocturna l home hemodialysis since 1994 include: improvement in teaching methods, pr eventing disconnects and air emboli, preventing catheter infections, and us ing arteriovenous fistulas and grafts for access. As of January 2001, there were 13 centers in North America performing daily nocturnal home hemodialy sis caring for 115 patients. Since 1997, all programs performing NHD have v alidated Pierratos' reported results, showing improvement in quality of lif e, better blood pressure control with fewer medications, reduced Epogen usa ge, reduced hospitalizations, control of phosphorous without binders, and a greater sense of hope for patients. Even though this new modality is safe and better for selected patients with ESRD, dialysis providers in Canada an d the United States cannot afford to offer NHD within the present reimburse ment scheme. (C) 2001 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.