Spatial distribution and its seasonality of satellite-derived vegetation index (NDVI) and climate in Siberia

Citation
R. Suzuki et al., Spatial distribution and its seasonality of satellite-derived vegetation index (NDVI) and climate in Siberia, INT J CLIM, 21(11), 2001, pp. 1321-1335
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Earth Sciences
Journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY
ISSN journal
0899-8418 → ACNP
Volume
21
Issue
11
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1321 - 1335
Database
ISI
SICI code
0899-8418(200109)21:11<1321:SDAISO>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) distribution and its seas onal cycle were investigated in relation to temperature and precipitation o ver Siberia and its surrounding regions. The analyses used 5-year (1987-199 1) monthly means. The monthly mean NDVI was calculated from the third-gener ation monthly Global Vegetation Index (GVI) product; monthly temperature an d precipitation at 611 stations were calculated from Global Daily Summary ( GDS) data. The 611 stations were classified by cluster analysis into 10 classes based on the NDVI seasonal cycle (March-October). The geographical distribution c haracteristics of the NDVI cycle were described using temperature, precipit ation and Olson's land-cover type. In northern regions, where tundra vegeta tion prevails and temperatures and precipitation are low, the amplitude of the NDVI seasonal cycle is small. In southern regions, where temperatures a re high and there is little precipitation, the seasonal amplitude of the ND VI is small because of the and land type. Forested regions were split into six classes, each characterized by large amplitudes in the NDVI seasonal cy cle. The phenological characteristics of the forest classes were noted. For example, a forest-class localized near Lake Baikal shows higher NDVI value s, even with the presence of snow cover in March, compared with other regio ns. This high NDVI value suggests that the exposed green canopy of the coni ferous forest can be observed even when snow is present. In addition, the N DVI peaks at stations near 60 degreesN, where the maximum monthly temperatu re is around 18 degreesC. This result suggests that the optimum temperature -precipitation environment coincides to the area in Siberia where the maxim um monthly temperature is 18 degreesC. Copyright (C) 2001 Royal Meteorologi cal Society.