Allocation of male parental care in relation to paternity within and amongbroods of the common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)

Citation
Ka. Peterson et al., Allocation of male parental care in relation to paternity within and amongbroods of the common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), ETHOLOGY, 107(7), 2001, pp. 573-586
Citations number
38
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Animal Sciences","Neurosciences & Behavoir
Journal title
ETHOLOGY
ISSN journal
0179-1613 → ACNP
Volume
107
Issue
7
Year of publication
2001
Pages
573 - 586
Database
ISI
SICI code
0179-1613(200107)107:7<573:AOMPCI>2.0.ZU;2-0
Abstract
The relationship between male parental care and paternity has been investig ated in a number of avian species, but in many cases the influences of conf ounding factors, such as variation in male and territory quality, were not addressed. These sources of variation can be controlled for by making withi n-male comparisons between successive broods or within-brood comparisons be tween groups of fledglings in a divided brood. We studied the relationship between male parental care and paternity in the common yellowthroat (Geothl ypis trichas) at three levels: between groups of fledglings in divided broo ds, between first and second broods of the same pair, and among all broods in the population. In this study we proposed three hypotheses: first, males in double-brooded pairs should provide relatively more parental care to br oods in which they have higher paternity; secondly, after fledging and broo d division, males should provide more care to related offspring; and finall y, among all broods in the population, paternity should be related positive ly to male parental care. Brood division occurred in many of the broods stu died; however, broods were not divided according to fledgling size or pater nity. Furthermore, within divided broods, males fed within-pair and extrapa ir fledglings at similar rates. For sequential broods of the same pair, mal e feeding rates were not associated with differences in paternity between b roods. Among all broods in the population, males did not provide relatively less care to broods containing unrelated young. The lack of a relationship between male parental care and paternity suggests that either males cannot assess their paternity or the costs of reducing male parental care outweig h the benefits.