Effects of resource allocation on behavioural strategies: A comparison of red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and two domesticated breeds of poultry

Citation
Ke. Schutz et P. Jensen, Effects of resource allocation on behavioural strategies: A comparison of red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and two domesticated breeds of poultry, ETHOLOGY, 107(8), 2001, pp. 753-765
Citations number
39
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Animal Sciences","Neurosciences & Behavoir
Journal title
ETHOLOGY
ISSN journal
0179-1613 → ACNP
Volume
107
Issue
8
Year of publication
2001
Pages
753 - 765
Database
ISI
SICI code
0179-1613(200108)107:8<753:EORAOB>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
Three different breeds of poultry, representing different degrees of domest ication, were observed in semi-natural conditions in order to study differe nces in foraging behaviour, activity levels and social behaviours which cou ld be caused by correlated responses to selection for increased production. The breeds used were: (i) red junglefowl (Gallus gallus); (ii) Swedish ban tam, which is a domestic breed that has not under-one selection for product ion traits; and (iii) Hy-Line, a White leghorn laying hybrid, selected main ly for food conversion efficiency. The birds were offered ad libitum food s imultaneously from sites where the food was freely available and from sites where the birds had to search and scratch for food which was mixed with wo od-shavings. The behaviour was observed three times per day (48 min/d), 3 d per week in eight groups four birds per group) of each breed between 7 and 18 wks of age. Junglefowl and bantam obtained a significantly higher propo rtion of their food from the site that required effort. The opposite case w as true for the Hy-Line. Overall, bantams performed significantly more fora ging behaviour than Hy-Lines. The fly-Line breed was more inactive and less involved in social interactions than the junglefowl and the bantam. The re sults support the idea that selection for high production results in modifi ed behavioural strategies. Behaviours that are of high energetic cost, such as extensive foraging and social interactions, were of lower in frequency in the laying hens compared to junglefowl and bantam, allowing the laying h ens to save energy that can be reallocated to production traits.