Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold

Citation
Ps. Muether et Jm. Gwaltney, Variant effect of first- and second-generation antihistamines as clues to their mechanism of action on the sneeze reflex in the common cold, CLIN INF D, 33(9), 2001, pp. 1483-1488
Citations number
31
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Clinical Immunolgy & Infectious Disease",Immunology
Journal title
CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES
ISSN journal
1058-4838 → ACNP
Volume
33
Issue
9
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1483 - 1488
Database
ISI
SICI code
1058-4838(20011101)33:9<1483:VEOFAS>2.0.ZU;2-V
Abstract
Treatment with first-generation antihistamines reduces sneezing, rhinorrhea , nasal mucus weight, and, in some instances, cough in subjects with experi mental or natural colds; however, treatment with second-generation antihist amines has not been effective for these complaints in trials in subjects wi th natural colds. This article reports the negative results of a clinical t rial with loratadine, a second-generation antihistamine, in adults in the r hinovirus challenge model. This finding in the highly controlled setting of the challenge model confirms the earlier negative studies with second-gene ration antihistamines in natural colds. First-generation antihistamines blo ck both histaminic and muscarinic receptors as well as passing the blood-br ain barrier. Second-generation antihistamines mainly block histaminic recep tors and do not pass the blood-brain barrier. The effectiveness of first-ge neration antihistamines in blocking sneezing in colds may be due primarily to neuropharmacological manipulation of histaminic and muscarinic receptors in the medulla.