Canada's reluctant housing program: The Veterans' Land Act, 1942-75

Citation
R. Harris et T. Shulist, Canada's reluctant housing program: The Veterans' Land Act, 1942-75, CAN HIST R, 82(2), 2001, pp. 253-282
Citations number
38
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
History
Journal title
CANADIAN HISTORICAL REVIEW
ISSN journal
0008-3755 → ACNP
Volume
82
Issue
2
Year of publication
2001
Pages
253 - 282
Database
ISI
SICI code
0008-3755(200106)82:2<253:CRHPTV>2.0.ZU;2-Y
Abstract
The Veterans' Land Act was a major element in the package of programs desig ned for Canadian veterans after the Second World War. It was primarily inte nded to promote farm settlement, although a provision for small holdings wa s supposed to enable urban workers to enjoy the benefits of rural living. T o this end, from the late 1940s, they were given assistance in building the ir own homes. In fact, the small holdings proved the most popular aspect of the Land Act, making it into a de facto urban housing program. Thousands o f urban veterans recognized that this provision could help them obtain home s at the suburban fringe. Together with veterans' organizations and elected representatives, they lobbied the government to adapt small holdings to be tter suit their needs, chiefly by reducing the minimum lot size requirement below 2 acres. They met with some success. Although the anti-urban sentime nt of policy makers limited its impact, the small holdings scheme was the m ost popular and effective all all government housing programs in the early postwar decades.