Participation in psychosocial group intervention among Japanese women withprimary breast cancer and its associated factors

Citation
S. Fukui et al., Participation in psychosocial group intervention among Japanese women withprimary breast cancer and its associated factors, PSYCHO-ONC, 10(5), 2001, pp. 419-427
Citations number
34
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology,"Clinical Psycology & Psychiatry
Journal title
PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY
ISSN journal
1057-9249 → ACNP
Volume
10
Issue
5
Year of publication
2001
Pages
419 - 427
Database
ISI
SICI code
1057-9249(200109/10)10:5<419:PIPGIA>2.0.ZU;2-F
Abstract
Though psychosocial group intervention is considered in the West to be an i mportant source of support for reducing psychosocial distress in cancer pat ients, in Asian countries, there has been no research as yet on the needs f or such intervention. This study investigated the level of participation an d interest in psychosocial group intervention plus any associated factors i n 151 primary breast cancer patients. All were less than 65 years old at 4- 18 months post-surgery. Of the 126 subjects who responded (response rate 83 %), 53 (42%) participated (participants) and 73 (58%) did not (non-particip ants). Participation was greater among those with a high level of anxiety m easured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (odds ratio [OR ], 3.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-10.42), those who had undergone surgery within the last 12 months (OR, 3.10; 95% Cl, 1.35-7.55), and those who were 50-65 years old (OR, 3.08; 95% Cl, 1.33-7.66). Among the non-part icipants, 53 (73%) were interested in the intervention while 20 (27%) were not. Non-participants without any interest in the psychosocial group interv ention had significantly higher anxiety levels than those with interest (t = -2.08; df = 71; p = 0.03). These results suggest that most Japanese breast cancer patients who need ps ychological support can be sought out by asking whether they are willing to participate in a psychosocial group intervention. However, the minority no t interested in any psychological group intervention might need other suppo rts such as medication or individual psychotherapy. Copyright (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.