Assessment of the food safety issues related to genetically modified foods

Citation
Ha. Kuiper et al., Assessment of the food safety issues related to genetically modified foods, PLANT J, 27(6), 2001, pp. 503-528
Citations number
144
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Plant Sciences","Animal & Plant Sciences
Journal title
PLANT JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0960-7412 → ACNP
Volume
27
Issue
6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
503 - 528
Database
ISI
SICI code
0960-7412(200109)27:6<503:AOTFSI>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
International consensus has been reached on the principles regarding evalua tion of the food safety of genetically modified plants. The concept of subs tantial equivalence has been developed as part of a safety evaluation frame work, based on the idea that existing foods can serve as a basis for compar ing the properties of genetically modified foods with the appropriate count erpart. Application of the concept is not a safety assessment per se, but h elps to identify similarities and differences between the existing food and the new product, which are then subject to further toxicological investiga tion. Substantial equivalence is a starting point in the safety evaluation, rather than an endpoint of the assessment. Consensus on practical applicat ion of the principle should be further elaborated. Experiences with the saf ety testing of newly inserted proteins and of whole genetically modified fo ods are reviewed, and limitations of current test methodologies are discuss ed. The development and validation of new profiling methods such as DNA mic roarray technology, proteomics, and metabolomics for the identification and characterization of unintended effects, which may occur as a result of the genetic modification, is recommended. The assessment of the allergenicity of newly inserted proteins and of marker genes is discussed. An issue that will gain importance in the near future is that of postmarketing surveillan ce of the foods derived from genetically modified crops. It is concluded, a mong others that, that application of the principle of substantial equivale nce has proven adequate, and that no alternative adequate safety assessment strategies are available.