A randomized intervention to improve ongoing participation in mammography

Citation
Jk. Barr et al., A randomized intervention to improve ongoing participation in mammography, AM J M CARE, 7(9), 2001, pp. 887-894
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science","Health Care Sciences & Services
Journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MANAGED CARE
ISSN journal
1088-0224 → ACNP
Volume
7
Issue
9
Year of publication
2001
Pages
887 - 894
Database
ISI
SICI code
1088-0224(200109)7:9<887:ARITIO>2.0.ZU;2-P
Abstract
Objective: To test the effectiveness of interventions intended to increase rates of regular breast cancer screening; according to recommended guidelin es. Study Design: A randomized controlled trial of 2 outreach interventions (a mail reminder and a telephone reminder plus appointment scheduling) compare d with a routine publicity campaign to encourage continued participation in mammography screening. Participants and Methods: Participants were 1908 women aged 50 to 75 years continuously enrolled in a large group-model HMO during the study who under went a bilateral mammogram during the first quarter of 1994 and no subseque nt mammogram during the next 18 to 21 months. Data were obtained from healt h plan administrative data files supplemented by medical chart review. Wome n were randomly assigned to receive (1) a mail reminder, (2) a telephone re minder, or (3) routine publicity on mammography for all women. The outcome measure was a mammogram received after the intervention period and within 2 years of the initial mammogram date. Results: Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses showed that partic ipation was significantly higher for women contacted by telephone than thro ugh routine publicity. Mail reminders were no more effective than a routine publicity campaign. Primary care physician and gynecologist visits increas ed the likelihood of a subsequent mammogram for women in all intervention g roups. Conclusions: Telephone contact by regular health plan staff was more succes sful than publicity in encouraging continued participation in mammography s creening in women enrolled in a group-model managed health care plan. Becau se mailings did not influence participation in mammography screening, healt h plans should be cautious about investing in member mailings without first evaluating their effectiveness in the context of existing outreach efforts .