Use of corporate sponsorship as a tobacco marketing tool: a review of tobacco industry sponsorship in the USA, 1995-99

Citation
Nj. Rosenberg et M. Siegel, Use of corporate sponsorship as a tobacco marketing tool: a review of tobacco industry sponsorship in the USA, 1995-99, TOB CONTROL, 10(3), 2001, pp. 239-246
Citations number
37
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science","Envirnomentale Medicine & Public Health
Journal title
TOBACCO CONTROL
ISSN journal
0964-4563 → ACNP
Volume
10
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
239 - 246
Database
ISI
SICI code
0964-4563(200109)10:3<239:UOCSAA>2.0.ZU;2-J
Abstract
Objective-To describe the nature and extent of tobacco company sponsorship in the USA during the period 1995-99 and analyse this sponsorship in a mark eting context. Design-A cross-sectional study of tobacco company sponsorships identified t hrough a customised research report from IEG Inc, and from internet web sit e searches. Methods-First, a customised report was received from IEG Inc, which identif ied sponsorship activities for Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds, Brown & Williams on, Lorillard, and US Tobacco for the years 1997 and 1998. Second, the inte rnet was systematically searched for tobacco industry sponsorships during t he period 1995-99 by the same parent companies and their respective brands. Results-During the period 1995-99, tobacco companies sponsored at least 273 3 events, programmes, and organisations in the USA. Sponsorships involved a ll 50 states and the District of Columbia, and the minimum total funding am ount of these sponsorships was $365.4 million. Tobacco corporate sponsorshi ps involved numerous small, community based organisations, both through dir ect funding and through grants to larger umbrella organisations, and many o f these organisations were part of the public health infrastructure. Conclusions-Tobacco corporate sponsorship serves as an important marketing tool for tobacco companies, serving both a sales promotion and public relat ions function. Public health practitioners need to develop better surveilla nce systems for monitoring tobacco sponsorship, to seek out alternative fun ding sources for tobacco company sponsored events and organisations, and to consider promoting a ban on tobacco sponsorship, possibly linking such reg ulation to the creation of alternative funding sources.