Effect of capsular injury on acromioclavicular joint mechanics

Citation
Re. Debski et al., Effect of capsular injury on acromioclavicular joint mechanics, J BONE-AM V, 83A(9), 2001, pp. 1344-1351
Citations number
24
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Ortopedics, Rehabilitation & Sport Medicine","da verificare
Journal title
JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME
ISSN journal
0021-9355 → ACNP
Volume
83A
Issue
9
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1344 - 1351
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-9355(200109)83A:9<1344:EOCIOA>2.0.ZU;2-W
Abstract
Background: Traumatic disruption of the acromioclavicular joint capsule is associated with pain and instability after the injury and may lead to degen erative joint disease. The objective of this study was to quantify the effe ct of transection of the acromioclavicular joint capsule on the kinematics and the in situ forces in the coracoclavicular ligaments in response to ext ernal loading conditions. Methods: Eleven fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders were tested with use of a robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system. The shoulders w ere subjected to three loading conditions (an anterior, posterior, and supe rior load of 70 N) in their intact state and after transection of the acrom ioclavicular joint capsule. Results: Transection of the capsule resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) in crease in anterior translation (6.4 mm) and posterior translation (3.6 mm) but not in superior translation (1.6 mm). The effect of capsule transection on the forces in the coracoclavicular ligaments was also significant (p < 0.05) in response to anterior and posterior loading but not in response to superior loading. However, differences were found between the forces in the trapezoid and conoid ligaments. Under an anterior load, the mean in situ f orce (and standard deviation) in the trapezoid increased from 14 <plus/minu s> 14 N to 25 +/- 19 N, while the mean force in the conoid increased from 1 5 +/- 14 N to 49 +/- 23 N, or 227%. In contrast, in response to a posterior load, the mean in situ force in the trapezoid increased from 23 +/- 15 N t o 38 +/- 23 N, or 66% (p < 0.05), while the mean force in the conoid increa sed only 9%. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: The large differences in the change of force in the conoid and trapezoid ligaments suggest that these ligaments sh ould not be considered as one structure when surgical treatment is consider ed. Furthermore, transection of the capsule resulted in a shift of load to the coracoclavicular ligaments, which may render the intact coracoclavicula r ligaments more likely to fail with anterior or posterior loading, The res ults of the present study also suggest that the intact coracoclavicular lig aments cannot compensate for the loss of capsular function during anterior- posterior loading as occurs in type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries.