The effects of tibial rotation on posterior translation in knees in which the posterior cruciate ligament has been cut

Citation
Ja. Bergfeld et al., The effects of tibial rotation on posterior translation in knees in which the posterior cruciate ligament has been cut, J BONE-AM V, 83A(9), 2001, pp. 1339-1343
Citations number
10
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Ortopedics, Rehabilitation & Sport Medicine","da verificare
Journal title
JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME
ISSN journal
0021-9355 → ACNP
Volume
83A
Issue
9
Year of publication
2001
Pages
1339 - 1343
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-9355(200109)83A:9<1339:TEOTRO>2.0.ZU;2-T
Abstract
Background: One of the most useful clinical tests for diagnosing an isolate d injury of the posterior cruciate ligament is the posterior drawer maneuve r performed with the knee in 90 degrees of flexion. Previously, it was thou ght that internally rotating the tibia during posterior drawer testing woul d decrease posterior laxity in a knee with an isolated posterior cruciate l igament injury. In this study, we evaluated the effects of internal and ext ernal tibial rotation on posterior laxity with the knee held in varying deg rees of flexion after the posterior cruciate and meniscofemoral ligaments h ad been cut. Materials and Methods: Twenty cadaveric knees were used. Each knee was moun ted in a fixture with six degrees of freedom, and anterior and posterior fo rces of 150 N were applied. The testing was conducted with the knee in 90 d egrees, 60 degrees, 30 degrees, and 0 degrees of flexion with the tibia in neutral, internal, and external rotation. All knees were tested with the po sterior cruciate and meniscofemoral ligaments intact and transected. Repeat ed-measures analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. Results: At 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees of flexion, there was a significant increase in posterior laxity following transection of the poste rior cruciate and meniscofemoral ligaments. At 60 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion, there was significantly less posterior laxity when the tibia was held in internal compared with external rotation. At 0 degrees and 30 degre es of flexion, there was no significant difference in posterior laxity when the tibia was held in internal compared with external rotation. Conclusions: After the posterior cruciate and meniscofemoral ligaments had been out, posterior laxity was significantly decreased by both internal and external rotation of the tibia. Internal tibial rotation resulted in signi ficantly less laxity than external tibial rotation did at 60 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Clinical Relevance: An isolated injury of the posterior cruciate ligament i s best detected when a posterior drawer test is performed with the knee in 90 degrees of flexion. Repeating this test with the tibia internally rotate d will result in a substantial decrease in the amount of posterior laxity a t 60 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion.