Contraceptive choices in HIV infected and HIV at-risk adolescent females

Citation
M. Belzer et al., Contraceptive choices in HIV infected and HIV at-risk adolescent females, J ADOLES H, 29(3), 2001, pp. 93-100
Citations number
26
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science",Pediatrics
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH
ISSN journal
1054-139X → ACNP
Volume
29
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Supplement
S
Pages
93 - 100
Database
ISI
SICI code
1054-139X(200109)29:3<93:CCIHIA>2.0.ZU;2-7
Abstract
Purpose: To describe reported contraception use in HIV infected and HIV uni nfected but at-risk female adolescents, and determine associations with the reported consistent use of effective contraception methods, including its association with pregnancy. Methods: HIV infected and at-risk female youth, aged 13-18 years, who were sexually active and reporting no intention to become pregnant, were include d. Contraception use data from three consecutive visits (approximately 6 mo nths apart) were used. Results: Ninety-four percent of HIV infected and 89% of at-risk subjects re ported choosing a main contraception method with demonstrated efficacy when used consistently. Approximately 50% chose partner condoms. HIV infected y outh were more likely to report 100% a partner condom use in the past 3 mon ths (73% vs. 46%; OR 3.3; 95% CI: 1.7-5.6). At-risk youth were 2.5 times mo re likely than HIV infected subjects to report using nothing (95% CI: 1.1-5 .8). Slightly more than half (56%) demonstrated the consistent reporting of effective methods (CREM) of contraception. In multivariate analysis, HIV i nfection (OR 4.0; 95% CI: 2.2-8.2) and AfricanAmerican race (OR 2.7; 95% CI : 1.1-6.6) were significantly associated with CREM. Subjects reporting inco nsistent or unreliable contraception use had higher 1-year pregnancy rates than CREM subjects (32% vs. 14%; p =.002): Conclusions: Only half of HIV infected and at-risk youth reported using eff ective contraception consistently, despite its availability. Additionally, regardless of reported contraceptive use, the rates of unplanned pregnancy were unacceptably high. Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2001.