Responses of woodland birds to increasing numbers of deer: a review of evidence and mechanisms

Authors
Citation
Rj. Fuller, Responses of woodland birds to increasing numbers of deer: a review of evidence and mechanisms, FORESTRY, 74(3), 2001, pp. 289-298
Citations number
47
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Plant Sciences
Journal title
FORESTRY
ISSN journal
0015-752X → ACNP
Volume
74
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
289 - 298
Database
ISI
SICI code
0015-752X(2001)74:3<289:ROWBTI>2.0.ZU;2-2
Abstract
Increases in grazing pressure within woodland can profoundly affect the spe cies composition of bird communities, but few studies have been conducted i n Europe and there is a lack of relevant experimental research. A principal mechanism by which deer can alter bird communities is through reduction of low foliage density. High deer densities may also be implicated in a varie ty of indirect effects on birds mainly by altering food resources and nest losses through predation. Breeding populations of migrant birds appear to b e especially vulnerable to increased deer densities in lowland British wood s because these species generally require dense understorey structures. Evi dence is presented that, possibly with the exception of nightingale (Luscin ia megarhynchos), populations of breeding migrants may persist in lowland w oods with increasing deer densities, provided that young regeneration is ad equately protected. However, a priority for research is to understand how b ird communities respond to different densities of deer.