The impact of deer on the ground flora of British broadleaved woodland

Authors
Citation
Kj. Kirby, The impact of deer on the ground flora of British broadleaved woodland, FORESTRY, 74(3), 2001, pp. 219-229
Citations number
65
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Plant Sciences
Journal title
FORESTRY
ISSN journal
0015-752X → ACNP
Volume
74
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
219 - 229
Database
ISI
SICI code
0015-752X(2001)74:3<219:TIODOT>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that the ground flora is being heavily affected b y increased levels of grazing within British broadleaved woodland, particul arly as a consequence of rising deer populations. General trends observed i nclude a reduction in Rubus fruticosus and other tall-growing herbs and fer ns (other than bracken, Pteridium aquilinum) and increases in grasses and l ower-growing species. Grazing of the flowers is common for some species and may be as significant in terms of long-term survival of the species as los s of leaf material. Most vegetation types contain some species that may be sensitive to grazing: their abundance will therefore be very dependent on t he grazing history of the stand. This can affect how the wood is classified under the National Vegetation Classification. Grazing impacts must be reco gnized by forest managers, but are not necessarily damaging in themselves. A variable and varying level of grazing within a wood is likely to bring mo st benefits for biodiversity.