Renal injury in perinatal hypoxia: ultrasonography and changes in renal function

Citation
K. Streitman et al., Renal injury in perinatal hypoxia: ultrasonography and changes in renal function, EUR J PED, 160(8), 2001, pp. 473-477
Citations number
16
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Pediatrics,"Medical Research General Topics
Journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
ISSN journal
0340-6199 → ACNP
Volume
160
Issue
8
Year of publication
2001
Pages
473 - 477
Database
ISI
SICI code
0340-6199(200108)160:8<473:RIIPHU>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Abstract
We studied 12 hypoxaemic neonates (5 mature newborns, birth weight 2850-420 0 g, gestational age 37-41 weeks; and 7 premature newborns, birth weight 77 0-1850 g, gestational age 27-34 weeks;) with repeated urine and blood chemi stry on the Ist and 3rd days of life. Nephrosonographical examinations on t he Ist, 3rd and 5-7th days of life were also performed. As controls, 12 hea lthy infants were examined (gestational age 36-42 weeks; birth weight 2450- 4200 g). Hypoxic neonates had higher serum creatinine and blood urea nitrog en levels. Tubular markers also demonstrated renal tubular damage. Neonates in both hypoxic groups were hyperuricaemic and hyperuricosuric, and had hi gher urinary protein concentrations. All these infants exhibited an increas ed echogenicity of the renal cortex, and 11/12 showed the same finding in t he medullary area. These findings disappeared within I week in all infants. Among the 12 healthy control infants, no cortical hyperechogenicity was fo und and only three of these infants displayed transient medullary renal hyp erechogenicity. Conclusion Since the hypoxaemic infants demonstrated greatly increased urin ary concentrations of uric acid and protein, we suggest that a temporary pr ecipitation of these two agents may be responsible for the ultrasonographic findings. Circulatory redistribution might play a role in the phenomenon o f cortical hyperechogenicity.