A numerical study of wave-current interaction through surface and bottom stresses: Wind-driven circulation in the South Atlantic Bight under uniform winds

Citation
La. Xie et al., A numerical study of wave-current interaction through surface and bottom stresses: Wind-driven circulation in the South Atlantic Bight under uniform winds, J GEO RES-O, 106(C8), 2001, pp. 16841-16855
Citations number
38
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Earth Sciences
Journal title
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS
ISSN journal
2169-9275 → ACNP
Volume
106
Issue
C8
Year of publication
2001
Pages
16841 - 16855
Database
ISI
SICI code
0148-0227(20010815)106:C8<16841:ANSOWI>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
The influences of surface waves on ocean currents in the coastal waters of the South Atlantic Bight are investigated by using a coupled wave-current m odeling system. The ocean circulation model employed is the three-dimension al Princeton Ocean Model (POM), and the wave model invoked is an improved t hird-generation wave model (WAM). The coupling procedure between the POM an d the WAM and the simulated coastal ocean circulation driven by uniform sur face winds are presented. The simulated results show that wind waves can si gnificantly affect coastal ocean currents not only through an enhancement o f wind stress but also through a modification of bottom stress. Wave-induce d wind stress increases the magnitude of currents both at the surface and n ear the seabed. On the other hand, wave-induced bottom stress weakens the c urrents both at the sea surface and near the seabed. Therefore the net effe ct of surface wind waves on currents depends on the relative importance of current modulations by wave-induced wind stress and bottom stress. The resu lts further indicate that at a fixed location, the relative importance of w ave-induced surface and bottom shear stresses in coastal ocean circulation depends on the surface wind field. For the constant wind cases considered i n this study, the effect of wave-induced bottom stress is more significant in along-shore wind conditions than in cross-shore wind conditions.