Object representations in dreams of Chicanos and Anglos

Authors
Citation
C. Kern et S. Roll, Object representations in dreams of Chicanos and Anglos, DREAMING, 11(3), 2001, pp. 149-166
Citations number
50
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology
Journal title
DREAMING
ISSN journal
1053-0797 → ACNP
Volume
11
Issue
3
Year of publication
2001
Pages
149 - 166
Database
ISI
SICI code
1053-0797(200109)11:3<149:ORIDOC>2.0.ZU;2-M
Abstract
The relationship between the cultures to which persons belong and their int ernalized object representations as revealed by manifest dream content was investigated. It was hypothesized that because Chicanos are from a more nur turing culture than Anglos, they would represent persons in their dreams as more differentiated, articulated, and integrated, with more benevolent int eractions. 50 Chicano and 50 Anglo university students (25 of each gender i n each culture) reported a total of 555 dreams that were scored according t o the Concept of the Object Scale (Blatt, Brenneis, Schimek & Glick, 1976). The Scale applies developmental principles concerning the three dimensions of differentiation, articulation, and integration to the study of human re sponses given to the Rorschach. This research applied the Scale to the mani fest content of the subjects' reported dreams. The cross-cultural hypothesi s was disconfirmed; however there were strong findings concerning gender Ge nder differences across culture were statistically significant in each deve lopmental dimension, ranging from females representing more humans, who are better articulated and more benevolently interactive (p < .01) to females reporting more intentional, congruent actions and more interactions (p < .0 5). The only cross-cultural finding was that Anglos represent more action i n their dreams than Chicanos (p < .05). Within the sample of acculturated C hicano subjects, genders were polarized to a much greater extent than in th e Anglo sample. Implications of the findings for theoretical understanding of gender and cultural differences in object representations are discussed.