16S/23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions for phylogenetic analysis, identification, and subtyping of Bartonella species

Citation
P. Houpikian et D. Raoult, 16S/23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions for phylogenetic analysis, identification, and subtyping of Bartonella species, J CLIN MICR, 39(8), 2001, pp. 2768-2778
Citations number
57
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Clinical Immunolgy & Infectious Disease",Microbiology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
ISSN journal
0095-1137 → ACNP
Volume
39
Issue
8
Year of publication
2001
Pages
2768 - 2778
Database
ISI
SICI code
0095-1137(200108)39:8<2768:1RISRF>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
Species of the genus Bartonella are currently recognized in growing numbers and are involved in an increasing variety of human diseases, mainly trench fever, Carrion's disease, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, cat scratc h disease, neuroretinitis, and asymptomatic bacteremia. Such a wide spectru m of infections makes it necessary to develop species and strain identifica tion tools in order to perform phylogenetic and epidemiological studies. Th e 16S/23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (ITS) was sequenced for four previo usly untested species, B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis, B. tribocorum, B. alsa tica, and B. koehlerae, as well as for 28 human isolates of B. quintana (mo st of them from French homeless people), six human or cat isolates of B. he nselae, five cat isolates of B. clarridgeiae, and four human isolates of B. bacilliformis. Phylogenetic trees inferred from full ITS sequences of the 14 recognized Bartonella species using parsimony and distance methods revea led high statistical support, as bootstrap values were higher than those ob served with other tested genes. Five well-supported lineages were identifie d within the genus and the proposed phylogenetic organization was consisten t with that resulting from protein-encoding gene sequence comparisons. The ITS-derived phylogeny appears, therefore, to be a useful tool for investiga ting the evolutionary relationships of Bartonella species and to identify B artonella species. Further, partial ITS amplification and sequencing offers a sensitive means of intraspecies differentiation of B. henselae, B. clarr idgeiae, and B. bacilliformis isolates, as each strain had a specific seque nce. The usefulness of this approach in epidemiological investigations shou ld be highlighted. Among B. quintana strains, however, the genetic heteroge nity was low, as only three ITS genotypes were identified. It was neverthel ess sufficient to show that the B. quintana population infecting homeless p eople in France was not clonal.