Predictors for development of hyperuricemia: An 8-year longitudinal study in middle-aged Japanese men

Citation
N. Nakanishi et al., Predictors for development of hyperuricemia: An 8-year longitudinal study in middle-aged Japanese men, METABOLISM, 50(6), 2001, pp. 621-626
Citations number
33
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Endocrinology, Nutrition & Metabolism
Journal title
METABOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL
ISSN journal
0026-0495 → ACNP
Volume
50
Issue
6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
621 - 626
Database
ISI
SICI code
0026-0495(200106)50:6<621:PFDOHA>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
To identify the factors responsible for increases in serum uric acid (SUA), a cohort of 1,312 hyperuricemia-free (SUA < 7.5 mg/dL and no medication fo r hyperuricemia or hypertension) male office workers aged 30 to 52 years we re examined annually for 8 successive years. Subjects who were found to hav e become hyperuricemic (SUA <greater than or equal to> 7.5 mg/dL) or who st arted medication for hyperuricemia during repeat surveys were defined as in cidence cases. The SUA trend was also examined in 1.062 subjects for whom 9 consecutive SUA values were available and who did not start medication for hyperuricemia or hypertension during the observation period. Multivariate analyses, excluding the baseline SUA level as a factor in the Cox proportio nal-hazards model, indicated that age (negative), body mass index (BMI), lo g triglyceride level, hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) level (negative), white bl ood cell count, and alcohol intake at study entry were significantly associ ated with the incidence of hyperuricemia. In the model including the baseli ne SUA level, baseline SUA level was the strongest factor for the incidence of hyperuricemia, and BMI, white blood cell count, and alcohol intake at s tudy entry remained as independent factors. From stepwise linear regression analyses for SUA slope, excluding the baseline SUA level as a factor, sign ificant correlates with SUA slope were, in order of their relative importan ce, slopes of BMI. HbA(1c) (negative), blood urea nitrogen, log triglycerid e level, total protein, and baseline levels of hematocrit (negative), white blood cells, and HbA(1c) (negative). In stepwise linear regression analyse s, including the baseline SUA level as a factor, SUA level (negative) and a lcohol intake at study entry emerged as significant factors for SUA slope. The cumulative percentage of variation for SUA slope was 25.6%. In conclusi on, obesity, alcohol intake, and multimetabolic disorders were determined t o be independent predictors for the development of hyperuricemia. In additi on, the white blood cell level may be a contributory factor. Copyright (C) 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.