Plant responses to competition and soil origin across a prairie-forest boundary

Authors
Citation
Da. Peltzer, Plant responses to competition and soil origin across a prairie-forest boundary, J ECOLOGY, 89(2), 2001, pp. 176-185
Citations number
74
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0022-0477 → ACNP
Volume
89
Issue
2
Year of publication
2001
Pages
176 - 185
Database
ISI
SICI code
0022-0477(200104)89:2<176:PRTCAS>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
1 The distribution of different plant growth-forms may be caused by interac tions among plants. Previous studies show that prairie and forest vegetatio n have different competitive effects and also influence both resource avail ability and soil community structure. 2 I used a field experiment to distinguish between short-term competitive e ffects and the long-term effects of vegetation on soils. Soil cores were re ciprocally transplanted between prairie and forest sites. Seedlings of a gr ass (Bouteloua gracilis) and a shrub (Elaeagnus commutata) were planted int o these cores and grown with or without neighbours. 3 Soil origin did not significantly alter the survival, growth or responses to competition of either transplant species. Bouteloua and Elaeagnus growt h was suppressed by neighbours to about the same extent in prairie, but onl y Bouteloua growth was suppressed in forest, resulting in a significant int eraction between environment and competition. All except one of the interac tions involving soil origin were not significant, suggesting that plant-soi l feedbacks did not modify the effects of competition or environment. 4 The results suggest that environment and competition have much larger inf luences on the performance of juvenile plants in the field than does soil o rigin. Further work is needed to determine the relative importance of resou rce competition and soil community effects on plant performance among speci es and study systems.