Oxidative biochemical markers; clues to understanding aging in long-lived species

Citation
Ra. Floyd et al., Oxidative biochemical markers; clues to understanding aging in long-lived species, EXP GERONT, 36(4-6), 2001, pp. 619-640
Citations number
87
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Medical Research General Topics
Journal title
EXPERIMENTAL GERONTOLOGY
ISSN journal
0531-5565 → ACNP
Volume
36
Issue
4-6
Year of publication
2001
Pages
619 - 640
Database
ISI
SICI code
0531-5565(200104)36:4-6<619:OBMCTU>2.0.ZU;2-6
Abstract
Clues as to why long-lived species live so much longer than short-lived spe cies may reside in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced and their effect on damaging cell components (especially proteins) and alterat ions of crucial cellular processes. Rigorous evaluation of these concepts r equired critical comparisons of oxidative damage markers and/or parameters with assess difference in ROS flux and the critical age-modifying processes they influence. The limited experimental comparative results available imp licate that ROS production per unit weight of total oxygen consumed is much less in the longer-lived species than in shorter-lived species. Mitochondr ia are the major site of ROS production. They are also the functional nexus for intracellular signaling thus modulating stress and growth factor media ted cellular survival, proliferation and apoptotic processes. Mitochondrial DNA mutations, perhaps caused by ROS, increase with age. Mutant mitochondr ia possess comparative replicative advantage, which leads to age-specific i ntracellular swarms. General inflammatory stress tends to increase with age . Disruption in coordinated cell-to-cell signaling triggered by alterations in intracellular signaling may be the basis of the age-related increases i n tissue inflammation, which may explain some of the differences between lo ng-lived species and short-lived species. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. Al l rights reserved.