The source, size and chemical composition of the winter arctic tropospheric aerosol layer observed by lidar at Eureka, Canada

Citation
S. Ishii et al., The source, size and chemical composition of the winter arctic tropospheric aerosol layer observed by lidar at Eureka, Canada, J METEO JPN, 79(1), 2001, pp. 61-78
Citations number
50
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Earth Sciences
Journal title
JOURNAL OF THE METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN
ISSN journal
0026-1165 → ACNP
Volume
79
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
61 - 78
Database
ISI
SICI code
0026-1165(200102)79:1<61:TSSACC>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
During the winter seasons from 1993-94 to 1998-99 at Eureka (80.0 degreesN, 86.0 degreesW) in the Canadian high arctic, we have observed tropospheric aerosol layers by using a Mie-scattering-polarization lidar system and we h ave investigated lidar parameters (Mie backscattering coefficients, aerosol depolarization ratios, and Angstrom exponents) of the layers. We calculate d isentropic back trajectories in order to investigate the source regions o f these layers. We also estimated the size of the particles in the layers b y calculating modeled lidar parameters and comparing them with the observed lidar parameters. Daily sampling of aerosol particles was carried out in t he late winter of 1998-99. Isentropic back trajectories of the aerosol laye r observed over Eureka at different altitudes suggested that the source reg ions of the aerosol were Eurasia, the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, the Arctic Ocean, and regions near the coast of the Arctic Ocean. The lida r parameters calculated by using the Mie theory and the modeled particle si ze distribution suggested that, although the Mie backscattering coefficient was determined largely by the number concentration of the accumulation mod e particles of diameter 0.2 mum to 0.3 mum, the aerosol depolarization rati o and,Angstrom exponent of the aerosol layers were influenced strongly by t he number concentration and the geometric mean diameter of the coarse parti cles. The trajectories, characteristics, and chemical compositions of aeros ols suggest that the arctic layers observed by lidar were composed of sulfa te aerosol or sea salt.