The relationship between craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea in whites and in African-Americans

Citation
B. Cakirer et al., The relationship between craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea in whites and in African-Americans, AM J R CRIT, 163(4), 2001, pp. 947-950
Citations number
35
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems","da verificare
Journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE
ISSN journal
1073-449X → ACNP
Volume
163
Issue
4
Year of publication
2001
Pages
947 - 950
Database
ISI
SICI code
1073-449X(200103)163:4<947:TRBCMA>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
Previous studies of craniofacial risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea ( OSA) have been based predominantly on cephalometry. However, differences in head form (measured by the cranial index [CII) and facial form (measured b y the facial index [FI]) are considered by anthropologists to provide a bas is for structural variation in craniofacial anatomy. We assessed the associ ation of head and facial form with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) in 364 wh ite individuals and 165 African-Americans. Data collected included cranial and facial dimensions (using anthropometric calipers), body mass index (BMI ), neck circumference, and the AHI. CI and FI differed for whites with OSA (AHI greater than or equal to 15) versus those without OSA (AHI < 5) (incre ased CI and decreased FI in subjects with OSA, p = 0.005 and p = 0.006, res pectively). CI and FI did not differ in OSA versus non-OSA groups of Africa n-Americans. In subjects with OSA, the CI in whites was again greater and t he Fl smaller than those in African-Americans (p = 0.007 and p = 0.004, for CI and Fl.) We conclude that brachycephaly is associated with an increased AHI in whites but not in African-Americans. The CI may useful in phenotypi ng and identifying population subsets with OSA.